Carmen Jany

Assistant Professor of Spanish and Linguistics

California State University
Department of World Languages and Literatures
San Bernardino, CA 92407-2393
cjany@csusb.edu

 

Philosophy Linguistics 101 Language Acquisition Proposed courses

Teaching
Linguistics

 

 

 

Teaching Linguistics

Currently, I am teaching courses on language acquisition and learning for future language teachers. In these courses, students learn about and experience the cognitive, affective, and social factors that affect first, second, and bilingual language acquisition and learning. The courses consider general aspects of language (sounds, structure, thought, interaction), language acquisition theories (behaviorism, universal grammar, cognitive theory, connectionism), children’s acquisition of first languages (sounds, structure, stages of development, lack of language, bilingualism), and second language acquisition and its relationship to the learner’s native language, environmental input, and individual learning styles, as well as differences and similarities between first and second language acquisition and various language teaching approaches. Particular attention is paid to how different teaching approaches developed in relation to language acquisition theories.

I have had many opportunities to teach a variety of courses during my graduate studies, including ‘Linguistic Analysis’, a course focusing on the great variety of linguistic structures found in the world’s languages. In my teaching capacities I have worked with undergraduates at all levels, taught both smaller (les

I have had many opportunities to teach a variety of courses during my graduate studies, including ‘Linguistic Analysis’, a course focusing on the great variety of linguistic structures found in the world’s languages. In my teaching capacities I have worked with undergraduates at all levels, taught both smaller (less than 20 students) and larger classes (up to 35 students), and mastered many teaching techniques through faculty guidance, mentorship, and teaching-related seminars. I have thoroughly enjoyed these teaching experiences, which have been very positively evaluated by my students and have earned me an Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. In conjunction with my PhD, I am completing a Certificate in College and University Teaching.

As a teacher I am committed to stimulating and leading a dynamic exchange of ideas, to helping students develop and elaborate critical and analytical thinking skills, and to supporting their creativity in finding new ways of exploring the matter at hand. The educational principles to which I adhere – maximal student involvement, motivation, creativity, and learning from experience – are part of a larger goal of guiding students toward intellectual independence and growth. I try to achieve this goal by fostering critical thinking and encouraging original research. I also strongly encourage the use of technology to facilitate learning and research.

I am able to teach a wide range of courses, from a general introductory course in linguistics to special courses in phonetics, phonology, and other aspects of grammar, such as morphology and syntax from a functional-typological perspective, as well as courses in field methods, typologoy, language contact and bilingualism, and applied linguistics. These are all areas of specialization I gained through course work and my own research. I would also like to teach courses which involve collaboration with a community, such as a course on language preservation and revitalization, and courses on learning and teaching with digital media, including the Internet. These are also all topics I am interested in. One of my goals as a teacher/researcher is to connect teaching and reasearchwhenever possible.

Last updated: 03/27/2008